PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICALS CHANGES MODULATED BY SEEDS’ PRIMING OF LENTIL (Lens culinaris L.) UNDER SALT STRESS AT GERMINATION STAGE


Abstract

Seed priming is one of the potential physiological approaches to enhance seed germination under salt stress. The present study examined the role of two seed priming molecules, salicylic acid (SA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to enhance the salt tolerance in lentil seeds at germination stage. Salt stress caused significant decrease in germination percentage and primary root elongation. This decrease was associated with significant increase in lipid peroxidation and total lipid (TL) contents in embryonic axis. The catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxydase (GPOX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities remained unchanged or decreased significantly under the influence of salt stress, in both embryonic axis and cotyledons. Starch mobilization was not affected by salt stress. The two priming treatments effectively alleviated the negative effects of salt stress. SA and H2O2 applications after dose optimization resulted in significant enhancement of germination percentage and primary root elongation. No significant changes in starch, soluble sugars contents and SOD activity were detected following SA and H2O2 treatments. Seed priming treatments triggered the activities of GPOX and CAT and caused the reduction of lipid peroxidation especially in embryonic axis. TL content and especially the fatty acid C18:3 increased after SA applications. The better performance under salt stress of primed lentil seeds was associated with lower lipid peroxidation, and activation of enzymatic antioxidative defense system. Obtained results confirm the potential for using SA and H2O2 to improve germination and plant growth under salt stress conditions.


Keywords

salt; seeds priming; Lens culinaris; antioxidant; fatty acids; germination; starch

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Published : 2019-10-28


Bouallègue, A., Souissi, F., Nouairi, I., Souibgui, M., Abbes, Z., & Mhadhbi, H. (2019). PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICALS CHANGES MODULATED BY SEEDS’ PRIMING OF LENTIL (Lens culinaris L.) UNDER SALT STRESS AT GERMINATION STAGE. Acta Scientiarum Polonorum Hortorum Cultus, 18(5), 27-38. https://doi.org/10.24326/asphc.2019.5.3

Amal Bouallègue  amal.bouallegue@hotmail.fr
Laboratoire des Légumineuses, Centre de Biotechnologie de Borj Cedria (CBBC), PB 901, 2050, Hammam Lif, Tunisie  Tunisia
Fatma Souissi 
Laboratoire des Légumineuses, Centre de Biotechnologie de Borj Cedria (CBBC), PB 901, 2050, Hammam Lif, Tunisie  Tunisia
Issam Nouairi 
Laboratoire des Légumineuses, Centre de Biotechnologie de Borj Cedria (CBBC), PB 901, 2050, Hammam Lif, Tunisie  Tunisia
Monia Souibgui 
Laboratoire des Légumineuses, Centre de Biotechnologie de Borj Cedria (CBBC), PB 901, 2050, Hammam Lif, Tunisie  Tunisia
Zouhaier Abbes 
Laboratoire des Grandes Cultures, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Université de Carthage, Rue Hédi Karray, 2080 Ariana, Tunisie  Tunisia
Haythem Mhadhbi 
Laboratoire des Légumineuses, Centre de Biotechnologie de Borj Cedria (CBBC), PB 901, 2050, Hammam Lif, Tunisie  Tunisia


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